E–pub/Kindle [Fate Is The Hunter] Author Ernest K. Gann


Fate Is The HunterCkpit recounting both the triumphs and terrors of pilots who flew when flying was anything but routinehttpswwwyoutubecomwatchvhjKHf Fate and destiny are bottom line answers to every precarious situation in Gann s near autobiography and philosophically speaking that really ain t my bag Apart from that it is a white nuckle ride through the early days of commercial airlines The why me and lucked out s became palling Actual rating 35 starsA fascinating near autobiography by an airline pilot "who flew from the late 1930s into the 1950s the era of DC 2s DC 3s C 87s and DC 4s " flew from the late 1930s into the 1950s the era of DC 2s DC 3s C 87s and DC 4s has some great stories to share many uite frightening and some of will have you gripping the edges of the book like a control yoke your gripping the edges of the book like a control yoke your white My god those were dangerous days and the early airline pilots took risks that would be inconceivable today letting down through solid weather with inaccurate altimeter settings until as low as fifty feet above the ground or ocean trying to establish visual contact with the surface flying into thunderstorms and icing conditions pressing fuel minimums beyond the point of no return and reading Gann s litany of departed airline pioneers men who died one after another usually a microsecond before their trusting passengers is a bit like standing inside the cleft of the Vietnam War Memorial thinking my god all those namesThis is not merely a history of the airline industry s early days it is also a history of the US Army Air Corps transport command set up in the early days of WWII and the establishment of trans Atlantic routes and refueling stops a history of American airline involvement in Central and South America and a lengthy treatise on the airline seniority systemWhy call it a near autobiography Because Gann changes the names of the departed and steadfastly refuses to name any of the airlines involved including his own Who after all these years does he think he s protecting It is typical of airline pilots never to slight their own organizations I suppose and Gann is no exceptionWhy not four stars Because this is a very wordy book and I found myself skimming over some philosophical and repetitious paragraphs trying to skip ahead to pick up the thread of a story The book is essentially a sting of there I was stories and they re all fascinating but you have to wade through thigh deep there but for the grace of god moralizing to get to the outcomes Some of Gann s there but for the grace of god musings are vital to the book however and you have to be careful not to skip over those At the heart of this book is a dissertation on fate the fickleness thereof Why did Gann survive this thunderstorm when so and so a vastly experienced pilot died under identical circumstances Why did Gann s engines eep running when after he landed ground crews found the tanks bone dryI m an aviator but my experience is in military fighters not the airlines Still I m fasci. Anctum of the cockpit and it is hear that Mr Gann is truly the artist” The New York Times Book Review“A splendid and many faceted personal memoir that is not only one man’s story but the story in

Ernest K. Gann » 0 summary

Nated by the story of aviation s development in the US and the world and this book is an insider s take on it told from the left seat despite skimming over a few wordy paragraphs I couldn t put it book down Amazing tales of one of the first commercial pilots As a pilot myself I was spellbound but I am pretty sure even a novice would fall head first into the exhilaration adventures as time passes across World War II #and the first people of the sky open up the world #the first people of the sky open up the world discover new frontiers Really good book written in 1961 about the early days of flying Starts out in DC2s and DC3s flying mail ROUTES AND OTHER SIMILAR TASKS THEN and other similar tasks then to doing flights for the military as WWII began to unfold He doesn t make a real big deal about it but the author really lost a LOT of friends to airplanes over the years and he had some close calls but was able to out distance fate at each juncture I can especially relate to his speaking of the insatiable appetite of a pilot to look skyward whenever we hear an airplane or to stand there looking at the runway as a plane takes off until it finally disappears into the distanceNo plot no apparent agenda just enjoyable reading about airplanes flying and pilots from a pilot that grew up as our aviation industry was in its infancy We now take flights for granted But it wasn t always this easy to hop on a plane and hours later land somewhere else This book tells the story This book returns the reader back to the golden pioneering days of Commercial airlines and all the danger and adventure that of the period Fate is a game of numbers and luck and the author takes us on his ride with fate with all it s ups and downs Anyone with a passing interest in flying needs to read this book you will not be disappointed For aviators this is the ultimate classic memoir Ernest Gann started flying in the late thirties flew transport planes all over the world during WWII and continued flying for airlines thereafter This book is part chronicle of his many adventures and misadventures part collection of thoughts on life and flyingEven a pilot with my limited experience can immediately discern the fundamental authenticity in the erudite voice of this true aviator The book is episodic with seuential periods and incidents within serving to move Gann s destiny forward Gann incidents within serving to move Gann s destiny forward Gann elegantly peppering his oftentimes long whimsical tangents with razor sharp understatement Technical matters become uncomplicated as they are reduced to how they really concern the pilot and his mental state The essence of what it feels like to fly in clear skies in storms and in pouring rain in Arctic winter and Saharan oven and jungle is elouently explained and examined with an eye for that poetic and magnificent experience that truly attracts pilots towards flightuite a magnificent book for pilots and one that will hold the interest of others as wellhttpwwwbooksrosbochnetp1619. Ssence of all men who fly” Chicago Tribune In his inimitable style Gann brings you right into the cockpit recounting both the triumphs and terrors of pilots who flew when flying was anything but routin. A piece of literature in disguise as a #aviation bookwho d of ever thought that a #bookWho d of ever thought that a and the overall field of aviation could be written about with such elouence beauty and vividness Since I was a child I ve been an aviation enthusiast so Gann s book which spans both pre and post WWII aviation is exactly the ind of novel I loveFor me a couple of pre and post WWII aviation is exactly the Dreamland. Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep kind of novel I loveFor me a couple of were particularly poignant from Gann s descriptions of early commercial aviation His descriptions of being a terrified and bullied co pilot who was expected to be a slave shut up andnow nothing and especially never uestion the Captain is very interesting and relevant and make me realise how much aviation has progressed an learned about crew resource management particularly in light of the 1977 Tenerife disasterOn a personal level I found the following description of flying with Hughen pp87 to 89 uite interesting I wonder if Hughen is one of those pilots secretly afraid of airplanes There area very few such men anxiously nursing their dread until the day they can retire Experience had worn them out instead of gardening them They exist in a half frightened daze like punch drink fighters and everyone I d dirty fir themAnd I really had no idea that even in the 1950s flight was such a hazardous undertaking even post war eg page 352If you re at all interested in aviation a hazardous undertaking even post war eg page 352If you re at all interested in aviation re sure to like this book and I highly recommend it Phenomenal collection of stories from the early days of airline and ocean flyingPart of me wishes I had the experience to write something like this most of me is very happy I don t Fate Is The Hunter is not a war story or a spy book it is instead a story of fate and how it can start careers and end lives but most importantly this is a true story of life and death The detail and emotion Gann wrote on these pages is astounding and you must take time to read each word and try to imagine the scene in your mind and feel the emotion The book starts with Gann when he is first learning to fly DC 3s and DC 2s in the early 1900s Throughout the book he tells of his adventures in first person from inside the cockpit of his airplane Although those who do not The Food Explorer The True Adventures of the Globe Trotting Botanist Who Transformed the American Dinner Table know much about aviation may not understand the suttle complexity of flying an old DC 3 or DC 2 they can still be gripped by the emotions Gann pours into his writing when he learns that one of his friends had just crashed into a mountain or simply fell to their death from three thousand feet By the end of the book almost every one of his friends has crashed or died After many times of believing this is the end or I am going to die here Gann finnalynew enough was enough and decided to start writing his experiences on paper therefore writing Fate Is The Hunter Description Ernest K Gann s classic memoir is an up close and thrilling account of the treacherous early days of commercial aviation In his inimitable style Gann brings you right into the co. Ernest K Gann’s classic pilot's memoir is an up close and thrilling account of the treacherous early days of commercial aviation “Few writers have ever drawn readers so intimately into the shielded